Hawaiian Heritage and Culture

Kamehameha I (Hawaiian pronunciation: [kmehmh]; ca. 1758 - May 8, 1819), also known as Kamehameha the Great, conquered the Hawaiian Islands and formally established the Kingdom of Hawaii in 1810... http://www.nps.gov/havo/historyculture/index.htm

Blessing Ceremonies in Hawaii

There are many ways to conduct a blessing. Each kahu will have been trained by his or her own mentors and will eventually create a synthesis which expresses a synergy of the kahus own mana`o (thought process), tradition, and the specific people for whom the blessing is being called.

Hawaiian Religion

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A depiction of a royal heiau (Hawaiian temple) at Kealakekua Bay, c. 1816 Hawaiian religion encompasses the indigenous religious beliefs and practices of the Native Hawaiians. It is polytheistic and animistic, with a belief in many deities and spirits, including the belief that spirits are found in non-human beings and objects such as animals, the waves, and the sky. Hawaiian religion originated among the Tahitians and other Pacific islanders who landed in Hawaii between 500 and 1300 AD.[1] Today, Hawaiian religious practices are protected by the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.[2] Traditional Hawaiian religion is unrelated to the modern New Age practice known "Huna."[3][4]

Merrie Monarch Festival Annually in Hilo

Welcome, and thank you for sharing your aloha for hula and the Hawaiian culture. The Merrie Monarch Festival is a non-profit organization that honors the legacy left by King David Kalkaua, who inspired the perpetuation of our traditions, native language and arts. Our week-long festival features an internationally acclaimed hula competition, an invitational Hawaiian arts fair, hula shows, and a grand parade through Hilo town.
Puako Petroglyphs

Puako Petroglyphs

Along the Kohala Coast, the Puako Petroglyph Archaeological Preserve features more than a thousand petroglyphs, or kii pohaku, lava rock carvings etched into stone centuries ago by Native Hawaiians. Although the true meanings of the petroglyphs are unknown, it is generally thought these carvings are records of births and other significant events in the lives of the people who lived on Hawaii Island long ago. Just a short walk from the Fairmont Orchid Hawaii, Holoholokai Beach (a well manicured beach-park with facilities) and the Mauna Lani Resort, you can see the carvings of human forms, canoes, turtles and others in the captivating petroglyphs fields of Puako. Take the kids on a petroglyph hunt and ask them what they think these ancient symbols could mean.
Location: Puako Hawaii, Mauna Lani Hawaii
Hiking to the Puako Petroglyph Field

Hiking to the Puako Petroglyph Field

Petroglyphs of Hawaiis Big Island Petroglyphs, or kii pohaku, are lava rock carvings etched into stone centuries ago by Native Hawaiians. Although the true meanings of the petroglyphs are unknown, it is generally thought these carvings are records of births and other significant events in the lives of the people who lived here long ago. See the carvings of human forms, canoes, turtles and others in the many captivating petroglyphs fields throughout Hawaiis Big Island. Within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park at the coastal end of Chain of Craters Road youll discover the sacred Puuloa Petroglyphs, the largest petroglyph field in Hawaii. You can see more than 23,000 images carved into the lava rock here, most before western contact in Hawaii. You can take a guided tour or take the .7-mile hike that ends on a boardwalk from which the petroglyphs are easily visible. In the Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park located three miles north of Historic Kailua Village (Kailua-Kona) you can find many mysterious petroglyphs scattered throughout the 1160-acre park. This historic National Park is also the site of Hawaiian fishponds, kahua (house site platforms), a holua (stone slide) and heiau (temples). Along the Kohala Coast, Puako Petroglyph Archaeological Preserve features hundreds of petroglyphs and is a short walk from the Fairmont Orchid Hawaii and Holoholokai Beach. On the grounds of the Waikoloa Resort, Anaehoomalu Petroglyph Field is another great place to view well-preserved Hawaiian petroglyphs. Many of the petroglyph fields in this area reside on the Ala Kahakai Trail, also known as the Kings Trail, a 175-mile trail corridor fu
Location: Puako, Hawaii
Toll Free: 800-332-7081